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Fracking and Ohio’s Future Conference

Fracking and Ohio’s Future Conference

An important one-day conference for legislators, regulators, and the public to learn about environmental and health impacts from unconventional shale drilling and what can be done to protect communities and Ohio’s economic and environmental future.

Frack Waste Facilities Proliferate in Ohio Despite Lack of Regulations

Frack Waste Facilities Proliferate in Ohio Despite Lack of Regulations

As the horizontal hydrofracking industry continues to operate without adequate regulation, the waste produced is a big problem for the industry for which Ohio has provided a cheap solution. Ohio not only allows waste from in-state fracking operations to be disposed of without traceability, monitoring and adequate regulation, it also is accepting waste from other states. Recently, plans were approved to allow the barge shipment of frack waste on the Ohio River, meaning frack waste could potentially come to Ohio from Texas and other states who find it easier and cheaper to send it to Ohio than dispose of it themselves.

16 New Toxic Waste Facilities

Frack waste facilities not noted in previous list, January 2015 – January 2016

Front Line Groups React to Coast Guard Decision to Deregulate Fracking Waste Shipments on Nation’s Waterways

Front Line Groups React to Coast Guard Decision to Deregulate Fracking Waste Shipments on Nation’s Waterways

For immediate Release                                                                                                    February 24, 2016 Contact: Teresa Mills, Buckeye Forest Council, teresa@buckeyeforestcouncil.org, (614) 539-1471 Terry Lodge, tjlodge50@yahoo.com Robin Blakeman, OVEC, rbrobinjh@gmail.com (304) 840-4877 Lea Harper, FWAP, wewantcleanwater@gmail.com, (419) 450-7042 FRONT LINE GROUPS REACT TO COAST GUARD DECISION TO DEREGULATE FRACKING WASTE SHIPMENTS ON NATION’S WATERWAYS On February 22, front line community groups throughout the Ohio River valley received notification that the U.S. Coast Guard has determined that no new rules are needed to barge shipments of toxic, radioactive hydraulic fracturing waste. The Coast Guard instead decided to proceed using 40-year-old regulations that fail to address unconventional oil field waste from hydraulic fracturing. Fracking wastes contain such toxic chemicals as benzene and are laced with radioactive materials like water soluble radium-226, which is linked to leukemia and bone cancers. The Coast Guard will instead allow shipment of waste fluids from hydraulic fracturing to be determined on a case-by-case basis. The proposal being considered by the Coast Guard would have required new rules and guidelines to transport highly flammable, explosive hazardous waste on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to currently undisclosed locations. Members of frontline organizations living along the Ohio River in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois have been voicing opposition concerns for several years about the Coast Guard allowing barges carrying 5 million gallons of liquid fracking wastes each to sail without procedures in place to address the hazards. “We cannot allow the shipment of toxic, radioactive fracking waste fluid on our nation’s drinking water sources. The risk to public health and safety is too high,” said Teresa Mills of the Buckeye Forest Council, based in Athens, Ohio. “It is not safe even on a case-by-case basis as is now being propose by the Coast Guard. This is not the waste stream from your 60-year-old mom and pop wells. The industry will not tell us what is in this waste, and that is just plain wrong.” Organizer Leatra Harper from Fresh Water Accountability Project of Grand Rapids, Ohio expressed “dismay and disbelief that the coast Guard would enable the unnecessary risk of floating toxic and radioactive frack waste on the Ohio River. This is purely to enhance corporate profits and is...

Ohio EPA Air Permitting Scheme Challenged

Ohio EPA Air Permitting Scheme Challenged

(Grand Rapids, OH) The FreshWater Accountability Project (FWAP) and Food & Water Watch have issued notice that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency should convene hearings and accept citizen comments to gather testimony from communities and individuals affected by the noisy and polluting gas pipeline compressor stations proposed for operation across Ohio. The proposed compressors would pump hydraulically fractured (fracked) methane gas at 1440 psi pressure at approximately 800 mph through the Spectra Nexus and ET Rover pipelines. The routes would cross Ohio, and run through Michigan en route to a storage and export distribution hub near Sarnia, Ontario, Canada. Pipeline opponents object to the carbon emissions, chemical carcinogens and radioactive particulate matter pollution that would be emitted due to normal operations, as well as to the explosion dangers posed by the pipelines and their compressor stations. The environmental groups accuse the Ohio EPA of quietly reviewing the permit applications with the intention of approving them without public notice or involvement. “We must expose the stealth processing of permits for industrial plants that will leak and exhaust significant amounts of methane and volatile organic compounds (VOC’s),” said Lea Harper, Managing Director of FWAP. “No one is looking at the total pollution and carcinogenic load of these pipeline projects, so we are insisting that the OEPA take testimony and evidence before the permits are finalized. The final approvals for the eight Nexus and Rover compressors planned for Ohio could be granted soon. It is urgent for the public to insist on having a role, especially those who will be downwind.” “If the pipeline compressors are put into service, they will collectively emit hundreds of tons per year of toxic pollutants and greenhouse gases,” said Alison Auciello, Ohio Organizer for Food & Water Watch. “They are planned near places where we live, work and congregate, exempt from local zoning controls, leaking carcinogens and endocrine disruptors for decades into our communities. Because most of the gas is slated for export, OEPA’s rubber stamp approval of these stations is even more suspect.” “The cumulative air pollution effect of the large pipeline projects planned for Ohio is alarming,” stated Terry Lodge, attorney and author of the letter to the Ohio...